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These four maps show how Barking and Dagenham’s richest and poorest live right next to each other

PUBLISHED: 12:30 26 May 2017

Barking town centre. Picture: Ken Mears

Barking town centre. Picture: Ken Mears

Archant

These four maps reveal stark differences in social inequality in Barking and Dagenham and show how the rich and the poor are sometimes living next door to each other.

Barking and Dagenham is shown within the blue lines. It is mostly coloured red, showing high levels of deprivation borough-wide Barking and Dagenham is shown within the blue lines. It is mostly coloured red, showing high levels of deprivation borough-wide

The Post explored the maps, created by the Department of Communities and Local Government (DCLG), to find the areas in the borough where differences in social deprivation are most marked.

The borough-wide map is coloured mostly red or dark red, indicating high levels of deprivation, but there are pockets of yellow which represent more prosperous neighbourhoods.

The darker the colour on the map, the more deprived the area is, according to the government data, and the areas shown in darkest red are in the 10 per cent most deprived in England.

We found in some parts of Barking and Dagenham the most and least deprived are living only a single road apart - or even on the same street.

Gordon Road is coloured both yellow and orange, showing increasing levels of deprivation within the same street Gordon Road is coloured both yellow and orange, showing increasing levels of deprivation within the same street

Gordon Road, Chadwell Heath

The difference in deprivation is starkest on this small street off the High Road.

It is striking to see that Gordon Road, a stone’s throw away from West Ham Football Club’s training ground, is coloured both yellow and red.

A small section of the road, nearest to The Warren School, is in the 40pc least deprived in England. But houses closer to the High Road fall within the 30pc most deprived on the index.

Westrow Drive, shown in yellow, is among the least deprived streets in the country, but homes in the red area on the other side of Mayesbrook Park are in streets with much higher levels of deprivation Westrow Drive, shown in yellow, is among the least deprived streets in the country, but homes in the red area on the other side of Mayesbrook Park are in streets with much higher levels of deprivation

Westrow Drive, Upney, Barking

This tree-lined road near Barking Abbey School and Manor Junior School is in the 40 per cent least deprived in the country.

So too are the surrounding streets of Melford Avenue, Beccles Drive and Stratton Drive.

But on the other side of Mayesbrook Park, the terraced houses of Rugby Road, Bromhall Road and Neasham Road, are in the 20pc most deprived.

The area around Church Elm Lane is in the 10 per cent most deprived in the country The area around Church Elm Lane is in the 10 per cent most deprived in the country

Church Elm Lane, Dagenham

An area stretching from Church Elm Lane to Dagenham Heathway Station and back towards Old Dagenham Park is coloured dark red.

These streets are in the 10 per cent most deprived in the country.

Railway tracks for the nearby station are only a few hundred metres away from these streets.

Jasmine Road, where the blue pin is located, is among the most deprived streets in the country but sits alongside other more affluent streets Jasmine Road, where the blue pin is located, is among the most deprived streets in the country but sits alongside other more affluent streets

• Jasmine Road, Dagenham

This street off Dagenham Road is one of the 20pc most deprived in England.

But just over the River Rom, nearby Edison Avenue and Grenfell Avenue, situated next to Grenfell Park, fall in the 30pc least deprived.

The government measures deprivation in all neighbourhoods in England using data about income, education, health, crime and housing, to give on overall deprivation ranking.

The Department for Communities and Local Government has been publishing the data since the 1970s and these maps are based on data collected in 2013.

At that time Barking and Dagenham was one of the 10pc most deprived areas of the country.

Explore the map above to see how your neighbourhood compares.

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