Search

Banker accused of killing was never in a fight before

PUBLISHED: 15:26 18 December 2008 | UPDATED: 10:33 11 August 2010

A BANKER accused of killing a pleasure boat captain in a drunken brawl is facing a retrial after an Old Bailey jury s deliberations ended in deadlock. Andrew Liddard, 28, is said to have punched veteran skipper Michael Micky Reed, 67, who later died of

A BANKER accused of killing a pleasure boat captain in a drunken brawl is facing a retrial after an Old Bailey jury's deliberations ended in deadlock.

Andrew Liddard, 28, is said to have punched veteran skipper Michael 'Micky' Reed, 67, who later died of a heart attack.

Liddard and his brother Christopher, 23, were thrown off the 'Millennium of Peace' boat at Tower Bridge Pier on the night of June 2 last year for drunkenly abusing passengers.

Christopher aimed a punch at Mr Reed's colleague, Martin Welsh, before Andrew struck captain, jurors were told.

Last week jurors cleared Christopher of Mr Reed's manslaughter, and of affray and assault occasioning actual bodily harm.

Christopher had admitted common assault on Mr Welsh and is due to be sentenced on January 30 next year.

His brother was told on Monday that the jury could not reach verdicts on the manslaughter allegation he faced.

The prosecution will announce whether he is to be retried on January 12.

Andrew Liddard, of Plomer Avenue, Hoddesdon, Herts, denied manslaughter and assault occasioning actual bodily harm.

Christopher, of Challinor, Church Langley, Harlow, Essex, denied manslaughter, affray and causing actual bodily harm.

He admitted common assault.

The jury had heard that Stepney-born Mr Reed, a father-of-three nicknamed 'Commodore Skipper' from Keel Close, Barking, had been married for 44 years, but had suffered heart problems since 2001.

The brothers, who are both bankers, had been on a drinking binge after visiting an art exhibition on the night of June 2 last year.

They became abusive on board the boat, and were asked to leave.

Giving evidence, Christopher admitted he had lost his temper after Mr Welsh swore at his brother.

He said: "I felt as though I had been taken off the boat, when for my part I had done nothing wrong. I just wanted to make sure I was going to get my money back.

"Andrew was having a disagreement with Mr Welsh again. There was an exchange of words.

"Mr Welsh kept laughing at Andrew. It was just a split second decision that I made."

Asked why he had taken a swing at Mr Welsh, Christopher replied: "Because of what he said, because of the way he was acting. I regret it.

"I wish I hadn't lost my temper for that second. Things were getting out of control, and I was scared of the fight developing, which it was.

"Ultimately, I knew that I had thrown a punch, and I had never been in a fight before.

"I really didn't want the fight to go on.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Barking and Dagenham Post. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the Barking and Dagenham Post