Dagenham couple hospital birth payout

A DAGENHAM couple, whose son died following critical delays by hospital staff during his birth, have been paid thousands of pounds in compensation. Midwives at Queen s Hospital, Romford, failed to see Nina and Nicholas Sullivan s unborn baby, Jake, was in

A DAGENHAM couple, whose son died following critical delays by hospital staff during his birth, have been paid thousands of pounds in compensation.

Midwives at Queen's Hospital, Romford, failed to see Nina and Nicholas Sullivan's unborn baby, Jake, was in distress in January 2007.

As a result, no urgent action was taken and he was born with severe brain damage. He died two days later.

Independent experts later told the couple the CTG trace, which monitors the baby's heart rate, would have shown he was distressed.


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They said if Mrs Sullivan had been given an emergency caesarean promptly, it is likely Jake would have survived and not suffered brain damage.

BHR Hospitals Trust, which is responsible for Queen's Hospital, admitted there were failings "in the management of the labour" and have apologised to the Sullivans.

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They awarded the couple a five figure sum in an out-of-court settlement.

Mrs Sullivan says the apology and compensation have given her and her husband some sort of closure but says she is still "angry and frustrated" over the mistakes made by the hospital staff.

The couple, who received their compensation last month, say they hope no other parents have to go through the same experience.

"We've been told the midwives have had more training on how to read a CTG trace since Jake died. I hope this is the case, because I would hate to think any other babies die because of their negligence," said Mrs Sullivan.

The Chief Executive of BHR University Hospitals, John Goulston, said: "Our sympathies are with Mr and Mrs Sullivan and we apologise unreservedly for the shortcomings in the care provided.

"We are pleased that a settlement has been achieved amicably.

"We have invested heavily in our maternity services since Jake's birth and continue to use patient feedback to improve services.

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