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College principal says Btec results gave ‘much truer reflection’ of earned grade than A-levels

PUBLISHED: 17:33 13 August 2020 | UPDATED: 17:33 13 August 2020

Barking and Dagenham College pupils are celebrating receiving their BTEC results today. Picture: Barking and Dagenham College

Barking and Dagenham College pupils are celebrating receiving their BTEC results today. Picture: Barking and Dagenham College

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A college principal says Btec results day was far less controversial than for A-levels because grades were based on assessments throughout the course.

Barking and Dagenham College principal Yvonne Kelly. Picture: Barking and Dagenham CollegeBarking and Dagenham College principal Yvonne Kelly. Picture: Barking and Dagenham College

Every Btec pupil at Barking and Dagenham College was awarded the grade their tutors put forward and some were even upgraded, while around 40 per cent of A-level grades have been revised downwards from teachers’ predictions.

Principal Yvonne Kelly said: “Whilst A-level and GCSE results are based on what a student achieves in an exam at the end of their course, Btecs, which are more hands-on practical courses, builds on their achievements as they progress through the course.”

Pupils studying for Btecs are assessed from the start and in a variety of ways - whether it be coursework, projects or practical assessments linked to the world of work.

The assessment grades, which demonstrate what each pupil has learned in each unit, are submitted to the awarding bodies to calculate the final grade.

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Ms Kelly said: “The way Btec are graded is a much truer reflection of students learning and achievements than what we are seeing now with A-levels and GCSEs.”

She added that given the post-pandemic economic climate, qualifications such as Btecs could also stand young people in a good stead to find work at the end of their studies.

“Not only do students develop specialist knowledge and skills within a particular area, they also learn the ‘soft’ skills that you need in any workplace such as resilience and adaptability,” Ms Kelly said.

“The true reflection of a vocational qualification is that you can apply your skills to different contexts.

“Covid-19 has had a significant impact on the economic climate and we have seen many stories about job cuts.

“Having those transferable skills will help set you apart from the crowd and help young people who are about to start carving out their career path.”


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