Hats and books raise Haiti cash

CARING and generous pupils at schools across the borough have raised more than �1,000 for Haiti s earthquake victims. Children were so shocked by the terrifying pictures and reports of the earthquake, which killed at least 100,000 people on the Caribbean

CARING and generous pupils at schools across the borough have raised more than �1,000 for Haiti's earthquake victims.

Children were so shocked by the terrifying pictures and reports of the earthquake, which killed at least 100,000 people on the Caribbean island on January 12, that they decided to do something about it.

Pupils at Marsh Green Primary School, South Close, Dagenham, decided to have a silly hat day last week and �365 for the survivors of the impoverished island.

Pupil administrator Ann Savage said: "A couple of girls from Year Five were quite horrified and saddened about the tragedy in Haiti.

"They spoke to the head teacher and asked if there was something they could do."

At Valence Primary School, Bonham Road, Dagenham, a book and bake sale raised �500.

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Year Five teacher Bethany Turner said: "Children from the whole school brought in books and other children bought them.

Year Five pupils made shortbread biscuits, which were really nice."

The sales raised �395 and the school donated the remaining �105.

The money will pay for a shelter box which includes a tent and cooking equipment.

Children and staff at Thames View Infant School, Bastable Avenue, Barking, raised �180 and Barking police station raised another �180.

At Barking Abbey School, Sandringham Road, Barking, students and staff have collected around �150 from the sale of cakes at a parents evening.

Enterprising students will help with the sale of sale of wrapped roses just before Valentines Day on February 12.

Meanwhile, at Jo Richardson School, Gale Street, Dagenham, school performances of the musical Guys and Dolls have raised hundreds of pounds for the charity

Students Sarah Sach and Emma Randall have raised over �300 in daily collections in and around the school. Sarah said 'We knew we had to do something to help'.

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