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Barking, Havering and Redbridge hospitals trust ‘failed to properly monitor liver biopsy man who later died’

PUBLISHED: 18:44 29 October 2014 | UPDATED: 18:44 29 October 2014

The two hospitals run by the trust: King George in Goodmayes (top) and Queen's in Romford (bottom)

The two hospitals run by the trust: King George in Goodmayes (top) and Queen's in Romford (bottom)

Archant

The trust that runs both hospitals serving Barking and Dagenham failed to properly monitor a man who died following a biopsy, official investigators have found.

Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust (BHRUT) also didn’t provide an adequate care plan and lost crucial clinical records in respect of the unnamed patient who died in 2010, the Parliamentary and Health Service Ombudsman said.

The trust, which also runs King George in Goodmayes, stressed that processes have since been put in place to protect patients who require a similar procedure. It is not known at which BHRUT hospital the incident happened.

More than 150 summaries of investigations carried out nationwide by the ombudsman between April and June were published this week, and 126 relate to health care.

The investigation into a complaint made against BHRUT found the patient - who died after bleeding internally following the liver biopsy - had an inadequate care plan, was incorrectly discharged from A&E and biopsy consent was not properly obtained.

He was also not properly monitored, cared for and given inappropriate medication after the biopsy, and BHRUT lost clinical records.

The ombudsman’s report said: “It was impossible to judge whether the biopsy was safe to proceed with, because of the missing records.

“We were unable to say if [the patient’s] death could have been avoided, but he was not given the best possible chance of surviving.”

BHRUT acting medical director Magda Smith said: “A comprehensive action plan was drawn up following the patient’s tragic death in 2010 and shared with his family.

“I hope that they are reassured that processes have now been put in place to protect patients who require a similar procedure.

“We have sincerely apologised to the family for the mistakes that were made.”

Other cases investigated concerned a one-day-old baby who suffered permanent brain damage following treatment by a nurse and two doctors of neighbouring Barts Health NHS Trust.

Read more:

Queen’s and King George hospital chief: ‘We’re starting to see improvements’


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