Man left disabled in Barking Hospital birth awarded multi-million pound payout

A disabled man left brain damaged after birth complications at Barking Hospital has been awarded a multi-million pound compensation payout.

Ross Taylor, 25, who was born at the Upney Lane hospital in 1987, suffers from severe learning disabilities and body spasms.

His mother Wendy went into labour with bleeding and he was delivered by emergency caesarean section after a complication that saw her placental lining detach itself from her womb.

Ross now lives in a home in Hastings, Sussex, where he requires constant care and supervision.

On Monday, health chiefs agreed to award Ross a �650,000 lump sum and annual �72,000 payments to fund his care for the rest of his life.


You may also want to watch:


His solicitor Trefine Maynard said: “What happened to Ross and his mother was a tragedy.

“The family can now get on with their lives knowing that Ross will have all the support he needs for the rest of his life.”

Most Read

Judge Stephen Oliver-Jones QC approved the settlement in the High Court in London.

An NHS spokesman told the Post: “London Strategic Health Authority, as the body responsible for care at Barking Hospital in 1987, wishes to extend its sympathy to the claimant and his family for the disability he suffered as a result of events shortly before his birth.

“Following detailed investigations by both parties, there remained uncertainty as to the cause of the claimant’s injuries however the parties were able to agree an amount of compensation with the family’s legal representatives which has been approved by the Court.

“The Strategic Health Authority wishes to extend its best wishes to the claimant for the future. “

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter