Payout for heartbroken Dagenham parents after stillbirth

�A Dagenham woman has received undisclosed damages after Queen’s Hospital admitted responsibility for the death of her baby girl.

Cindy Laing, 32, was admitted to the hospital in Romford in 2007 for the birth of her second child.

On April 7 that year, she attended because she was concerned that the fetus had stopped moving.

But after carrying out tests, she was reassured by staff that there was nothing to worry about and was told to return to her Fanshawe clinic four days later. At that appointment a scan showed the baby’s heart rate was slowing down.

Mrs Laing was taken to the hospital’s maternity unit by ambulance with husband Neill, 36, on April 11 where a further scan showed signs of fetal distress.


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These results were ignored and baby Evie died before doctors could deliver her. She was delivered stillborn five hours later.

Mrs Laing said: “We will never get over losing Evie. We will have a lifetime of heartbreak. Our family and friends have been equally affected by the loss. I hope the hospital learns from the failings in my care and improves its services, so this doesn’t happen to anyone else.

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“I warn every expectant mother to be vigilant about their maternity care and not to be afraid to speak up if they feel something is going wrong.”

The case was settled out of court, but the family’s solicitors would not reveal the exact amount.

The family received a letter of apology from chief executive Averil Dongworth in which she offered her “sincere apologies” and added that the trust had “put into practice lessons learnt from your experience”.

Last month watchdog the Care Quality Commission found that maternity services at Queen’s were failing to meet essential standards in quality and safety.

At the time of going to press, a spokesperson for Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals Trust, was unavailable for comment.

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