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Film released as part of youth violence campaign by Barking and Dagenham Council amasses almost 25,000 views

PUBLISHED: 17:00 28 August 2020

The campaign posters for the Lost Hours digital campaign, which aims to reduce the amount of youth violence and anti-social behaviour in Barking and Dagenham. Picture: Cash Boyle

The campaign posters for the Lost Hours digital campaign, which aims to reduce the amount of youth violence and anti-social behaviour in Barking and Dagenham. Picture: Cash Boyle

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The film released by Barking and Dagenham Council as part of its anti-youth violence campaign has been viewed almost 25,000 in two weeks.

The short film released by Barking and Dagenham Council as part of its Lost Hours campaign has amassed almost 25,000 views in two weeks. Picture: LBBDThe short film released by Barking and Dagenham Council as part of its Lost Hours campaign has amassed almost 25,000 views in two weeks. Picture: LBBD

Directed by local filmmaker Nathan Miller, Lost Hours — featuring the testimony of Peter Chesney and Beatrice Mushiya, each of whom have lost a child to knife crime — has really resonated with the wider community.

It features known landmarks such as Barking Station, Dagenham Heathway and the Gascoigne estate to hammer home the severity of the problem in the borough.

The film forms part of a wider campaign of the same name, which focuses on the “lost period” between 3pm when children finish school and 7pm when parents return from work.

Data from the crime and disorder strategic assessment shows that there is generally an increase in youth violence in Barking and Dagenham during this time.

There has been a general spike in this type of violence in the borough over the past two years, during which there has been 67 registered knife attacks causing injury, and 1,794 personal property robberies committed by a young person.

Such alarming trends prompted the creation of this campaign, which was headed up by the council’s cabinet member for social care and health, Councillor Maureen Worby.

Though “delighted” with the response to the film, she warned that parents must remain vigilant about the dangers which brought about the campaign in the first place.

She said: “Unfortunately, youth violence is happening on our doorsteps and we need parents to start realising that their children could be involved. So, we’re asking you to start questioning your children, before they do something they may later regret.”

This type of traction is exactly what filmmaker Nathan hoped to achieve when he agreed to be involved in the project; speaking ahead of this month’s campaign launch, he explained his personal interest.

He said: “Growing up in east London, I’ve seen the effects of knife crime and youth violence and I want to play my part in trying to stop it.”

For more information on further phases of the campaign, or to see the film, visit losthours.org.


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