Meeting a wooly jumper!

FOR this little sheep, the prospect of losing all her wool was not a pleasant thought, especially when the weather was nearer November than June. That was the scene for this Days of the Old School Yard picture back in the summer of 1989. In fact being sca

FOR this little sheep, the prospect of losing all her wool was not a pleasant thought, especially when the weather was nearer November than June.

That was the scene for this Days of the Old School Yard picture back in the summer of 1989. In fact being scalped in such chilly conditions was worth putting up a fight for and the ewe was not going to take such indignities lying down.

Pupils from Elmhurst Junior School, Forest Gate, thought it was all part of the fun. That is until farm worker Caroline Salter produced the shears to do the job.

"She's going to kill it," whispered one little girl when she saw the lethal-looking tool.


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Then it was a case of the sheep being swept off her feet and whoosh - a quick, short back and sides! The 26 youngsters from the Upton Park Road School had never seen anything like it.

They stared in wonder as Caroline explained that the sheep needed to be sheared as it was getting too hot in the summer.

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The way the seven and eight-year-olds descended on the farm in Weaver Street it was obvious that for many, it was the first time they had been close to such animals.

Their squeals of delight and terror as they gingerly leaned forward to stroke the resident sheep, cows, goats and ponies echoed around the little city farm.

As teacher Sue Griffiths said back then: "These are city kids. Just being at a farm and seeing and smelling the animals is a lesson.

"It is a real eye opener. Some of them have never been to the country.

And the wide-eyed youngsters it was off to look at the three-week old piglets and enjoy a ride in a donkey cart.

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