House prices have surged across the UK as Brits are hit from all sides during the ongoing cost of living crisis

Halifax's research has revealed that 2022 was another 'rapid year for house price growth' for many areas across the UK.

York, Swansea and Chelmsford were among the towns and cities that saw the strongest house price inflation this year meaning that towns and cities in the South East are no longer dominating Halifax's list.

The analysis breaks down the towns and cities that saw the biggest increases as well as the areas that reported the weakest house price annual growth in 2022.

Barking and Dagenham Post: House prices have increased 'rapidly' in many areas across the UK this year. (PA)House prices have increased 'rapidly' in many areas across the UK this year. (PA) (Image: PA)

The figures outline the area, followed by the average house price, the cash increase and the percentage change from November 2021- November 2022.

20 UK towns and cities with the highest house price increases in 2022

Here are the UK towns and cities with the highest house price increases in 2022:

1. York, Yorkshire and the, Humber, £370,639, £69,648, 23.1%

2. Woking, South East, £586,925, £93,626, 19.0%

3. Swansea, Wales, £265,379, £39,450, 17.5%

4. Chelmsford, East of England, £485,770, £69,775, 16.8%

5. Kettering, East Midlands, £326,895, £44,731, 15.9%

6. Derby, East Midlands, £277,491, £37,953, 15.8%

7. Wellingborough, East Midlands, £306,985, £41,087, 15.5%

8. Peterborough, East of England, £289,994, £37,599, 14.9%

9. Bristol, South West, £394,126, £50,864, 14.8%

10. Cambridge, East of England, £531,730, £68,586, 14.8%

11. Brentwood, East of England, £533,327, £66,998, 14.4%

12. Bournemouth, South West, £365,148, £45,559, 14.3%

13. Hove, South East, £526,201, £65,255, 14.2%

14. Colchester, East of England, £377,003, £46,208, 14.0%

15. Birmingham, West Midlands, £269,385, £32,563, 13.8%

16. Milton Keynes, South East, £416,496, £49,594, 13.5%

17. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, North East, £260,675, £30,157, 13.1%

18. Nottingham, East Midlands, £286,696, £32,966, 13.0%

19. Southampton, South East, £316,286, £36,151, 12.9%

20. Cheltenham, South West, £406,767, £45,972, 12.7%

READ MORE: Most expensive streets in England, Wales and Scotland

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Kim Kinnaird, mortgages director at Halifax, said: “Overall 2022 was another year of rapid house price growth for most areas in the UK.

“And unlike many years in the past, the list isn’t dominated by towns and cities in the South East.

“Nowhere is that more the case than in the cathedral city of York, which saw the highest property price inflation across England and Wales this year, rising by over a fifth.

“While existing homeowners will welcome the increased value of their home, such a jump makes it much more challenging for those looking to step on to the property ladder or move into the city.

“While London still has some of the highest property prices in the country, it recorded comparatively modest house price inflation over the last 12 months.

“This is partly due to pandemic-driven shifts in housing preferences as buyers sought bigger properties further from urban centres.

“We can see this clearly in commuter towns such as Woking, Chelmsford and Hove, which – with their more diverse range of properties perhaps offering better value – recorded much bigger increases over the last year.”

20 UK towns and cities with lowest house price increases in 2022

Here are the UK towns and cities that reported the weakest annual growth from November 2021-22.

1. Leicester, East Midlands, £271,092, minus £10,212, minus 3.6%

2. Hull, Yorkshire and the Humber, £163,677, minus £4,956, minus 2.9%

3. Maidenhead, South East, £549,722, minus £12,326, minus 2.2%

4. Stoke-on-Trent, West Midlands, £183,928, minus £3,149, minus 1.7%

5. Islington, London, £712,843, £3,059, 0.4%

6. Tower Hamlets, London, £530,056, £3,582, 0.7%

7. Westminster, London, £770,517, £6,510, 0.9%

8. Lambeth, London, £601,372, £8,224, 1.4%

9. Weston-Super-Mare, South West, £264,569, £3,649, 1.4%

10. Hackney, London, £639,995, £10,743, 1.7%

11. Harlow, East of England, £348,180, £6,227, 1.8%

12. Warrington, North West, £282,457, £5,079, 1.8%

13. Huddersfield, Yorkshire and the Humber, £253,105, £4,773, 1.9%

14. Oldham, North West, £220,427, £4,309, 2.0%

15. Newport (City of), Wales, £247,245, £5,645, 2.3%

16. Wakefield, Yorkshire and the Humber, £243,589, £5,754, 2.4%

17. Southwark, London, £620,472, £15,043, 2.5%

18. Lewisham, London, £519,971, £13,558, 2.7%

19. Gloucester, South West, £286,914, £7,760, 2.8%

20. Camden, London, £773,263, £22,145, 2.9%

Barking and Dagenham Post: Halifax has revealed the towns and cities which saw the highest and lowest increases in house prices in 2022. (PA)Halifax has revealed the towns and cities which saw the highest and lowest increases in house prices in 2022. (PA) (Image: PA)

What are the average house prices across the UK with Scotland, Wales and England statistics?

House prices have risen across the UK but at comparable different rates between the nations as well as within England's regions.

Scotland's average house price rise by 10.9% with a cash increase of £23,814 to £242,213.

Meanwhile, in Wales, the average house price now sits at £257,965 with a cash increase of £20,669 which equates to 8.7%.

Halifax's data was also broken down across England's regions.

As above, the data shows the area, the average house price, cash increase and percentage change over the 12 months to November 2022.

- East Midlands, £292,427, £23,481, 8.7%

– East of England, £421,710, £43,431, 11.5%

– London, £596,667, £39,877, 7.2%

– North East, £221,983, £17,776, 8.7%

– Northern Ireland, £210,550, £21,560, 11.4%

– North West, £268,573, £23,442, 9.6%

– South East, £477,003, £58,970, 14.1%

– South West, £364,759, £39,025, 12.0%

– West Midlands, £298,193, £26,801, 9.9%

– Yorkshire and the Humber, £259,031, £21,999, 9.3%

 

Tom Bill, head of UK residential research at estate agent Knight Frank, said: “This year saw the ‘escape to the country’ trend wind down while the return to towns and cities gathered pace.

“York captures the best of both of those worlds. Many people moved to Yorkshire during the pandemic due to family ties and the relative affordability compared to areas such as the Cotswolds.

“Meanwhile, the strength of south-east England underlines the gravitational pull of the capital as the economy reopens.

“London prices were more muted due to affordability constraints that predate the pandemic, which mean prices in the commuter belt and beyond should continue to outperform the capital in the medium-term.”