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Dagenham family deny claims that £16,000 of charity cash will not be used for treatment

PUBLISHED: 13:00 31 July 2013 | UPDATED: 15:24 31 July 2013

Rebecca Warren

Rebecca Warren

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The family of a cancer-stricken mum have hit out at claims more than £16,000 in fundraising cash will not be spent on treating tumours.

Fundraiser Lisa Hicks with her tattoo in support of Rebecca WarrenFundraiser Lisa Hicks with her tattoo in support of Rebecca Warren

The money – currently at £16,711 according to one fundraising page – was raised at a number of events for Dagenham mum-of-three Rebecca Warren, who suffers spinal cancer.

When the campaign kicked off in December Rebecca and her family said the funds would be used for treatment abroad, as doctors here could do no more.

They had hoped to raise more than £200,000.

But over the weekend a row erupted on her Facebook fundraising page, with many questioning whether the money was or would be used to treat the 33-year-old.

In response her sister, Jakki Warren posted: “I have spoken to all those who have raised money for my sister … and many others who will be confirming that they [are] happy for my sister to do what she wishes with the money… if anyone objects they need to tell me now.”

But Jakki later told the Post the money would be used to find “a cure” for the tumours, but a suitable treatment had not yet been found.

She said some comments on Facebook were extremely hurtful and making the family’s lives “a living hell”.

Fundraiser Lisa Hicks, 35, of Harold Road, said she had organised a number of events for Rebecca and wants some kind of proof the money will be used for treatment or given to someone else in need.

“I was really touched by what Rebecca was going through and wanted to do my bit. I even had a tattoo done to show my support. I know she is definitely ill, but I’m confused what’s happening with the money.”

Rebecca was unable to comment, said Jakki, because she had just undergone an operation to “de-bulk” the tumours at Queen’s Hospital. “The surgery is necessary to prevent her from losing her legs,” she said, adding: “This is no way a cure. People seem to think because she is in hospital she must not need treatment abroad but that’s not the case. We want to find something that will get rid of the cancer completely.”

She said if money is not needed it will be donated to a charity.


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