We stood in silence in support of troops

Chris Carter THERE was an added poignancy to the Remembrance events this week – and the increase in attendance seemed to reflect this. For those who stood in silence it wasn t hard to imagine the hell of those who fight a war in our name. The horrors of World WarOne a

Chris Carter

THERE was an added poignancy to the Remembrance events this week - and the increase in attendance seemed to reflect this.

For those who stood in silence it wasn't hard to imagine the hell of those who fight a war in our name.

The horrors of World WarOne are real to many of us, especially those who lost relatives. My generation have their parents to attest to the terrors World War Two brought them.


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The wrongs and rights can be argued, but what must not be forgotten is the men and women who are fighting in our name.

The majority of people who stood in silence this week were not standing in support of war, or glorying in its horrific results.

They were supporting the troops who are fighting today - and those of yesterday who fought and died in conflicts which were not always widely backed.

It's a tragedy, but a necessity that Remembrance events endure.

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